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Aivlosin® in pigs

 

Swine Dysentery

Swine Dysentery is a highly contagious disease of grower and finisher pigs, caused by the bacteria Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. This lives in the large intestine and damages the lining of the gut, but at certain stages of the disease cycle the organisms may be present in the cells lining the intestine.



Clinical signs

Spread of the disease

Diagnosis

Treatment

Management and control

Effectiveness of Aivlosin®



Clinical signs

The incubation period for Swine Dysentery is variable. Initially, infected pigs may appear depressed and have a reduced appetite. The acute form of the disease is characterised by diarrhoea and the pig may show signs of abdominal pain. In severe cases, diarrhoea contains blood and mucus, and death may result from dehydration. When the disease has become well established in a herd and hence more chronic, effects such as a low growth rate and reduced feed efficiency become evident.

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Spread of the disease

Swine Dysentery can spread throughout a herd from the initial introduction of an infected pig. The organism is excreted in the faeces and can spread by various means including contaminated boots or vehicles. Rodents may also harbour the bacterium and aid in its transmission. Even after a pig has recovered from the disease the bacterium can be excreted in faeces.

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Diagnosis

Diagnosis of Swine Dysentery may be based on clinical signs and examination of characteristic pathological lesions in the large intestine. However, this may not provide conclusive evidence, as other conditions that can occur in conjunction with Swine Dysentery may be confused with the actual disease. Post-mortem specimens from infected pigs can be sent to a laboratory in order to isolate and identify the presence of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. Laboratory tests that may be used to identify Swine Dysentery include histopathology, culture from intestinal scrapings or faeces, and PCR.

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Treatment

Infected pigs need to be treated as soon as possible with Aivlosin®. An effective treatment regime generally includes water medication of infected pigs, followed by in-feed medication for the rest of the herd in order to prevent spread of the disease. In situations where pigs are unable to drink or eat, an injectable antibiotic should be used.

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Management and control

Effective control of Swine Dysentery requires the implementation of several procedures: medicate water and/or feed; clean and disinfect the premises; reduce population density where possible; isolate infected pigs and do not allow herds to mix. Rodents can act as vectors of the disease and control of the rodent population is of key importance.

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Effectiveness of Aivlosin®

Use of water and in-feed antibiotics are standard treatments for infections with Swine Dysentery. Aivlosin®'s active ingredient, tylvalosin, is an innovative molecule that acts quickly. Aivlosin® should be considered for use in control programmes, particularly where resistance to other antibiotics has developed.

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